×
A Prank Map Of Fast-Food Chains Was Tweeted And Sparked A Hilarious Debate

A Prank Map Of Fast-Food Chains Was Tweeted And Sparked A Hilarious Debate

What's important in life - Food

The internet is home to crazy things, even large scale pranks that make people lose their minds. That is what The Barstool Sports Twitter account did when it shared a graphic map of favorite fast-food chains, state-wise, crediting data from the Public Information and Statistics Society, which does not exist.

 



 

 

People fell for it and fell real hard, leading to a whole debate on the 'issue'. The story was covered by In The Know which wrote, "If you’ve been on the internet for any amount of time, you know that not everything you see here is true.
A map of the U.S. that indicates each state’s favorite fast-food restaurant recently went viral, setting the internet ablaze for hours — and it’s totally fake.
The Barstool Sports Twitter account shared the graphic on June 5, crediting data from the Public Information and Statistics Society, which does not exist."

 



 

 

The article further reads, "At first glance, the map looks legitimate. It’s not surprising that folks in North Carolina love Bojangles, or that Montana residents appreciate McDonald’s and Hawaiians like Burger King. When you look closer, though, you’ll notice that Sbarro is king in the realm of pizza snobs (New York), Chuck E. Cheese appears on the map three times (even though the restaurant chain was recently caught selling food under a fake name) and … is that the Rainforest Cafe logo on Colorado?"

 



 

 

"The inaccuracies go on and on. Some Twitter users identified the map as fake immediately. “This is an extremely impressive troll,” one Twitter user wrote.
“Philly cheesesteaks from subway are what I miss most about home,” another joked. That didn’t stop people from expressing their anger, though. “This poll is a lie,” one person summarized. “Apparently only 8-year-olds were polled in Minnesota, Illinois, and Nebraska,” one user wrote. Another user pointed out that he probably meant Missouri, not Minnesota. Any way you look at it, this map was clearly designed to get people talking — and it has certainly succeeded in that mission," the site wrote. 

 



 

 

Clearly people had extremely intense reactions to the post and it says a lot doesn't it, we clearly care for our food and our favorite chains but don't care enough to understand humor (mic drop). That being said, the person behind the post deserves a raise.

Recommended for you